Category: Photography Tips


 

Hey Folks!

Thanks for dropping by here! 🙂

I always have had a problem choosing a good memory card for my shoots and maintaining it without any fear of losing the clicks after coming back home with a very excited and satisfied photo shoot. If you had any chance happened to experience the same, I understand the place quite well, as I have been a victim myself to such situations.

After I had got my memory card corrupted for the 2nd time quite recently and partly successful in retrieving it back, I started hunting for the tips to handle the memory cards on web, and getting few tips from my fellow photographers, Here are few of the points I have keyed it down to share over here…

 

Put Off:

Never remove or insert the Memory card into camera when it’s ON. This has proved to be the major reason for your card to get corrupted.

 

Format your card:

Each time you download your data to your computer, it’s always better to format your card. Because there would be default few folders which would be created each time you insert your card into Camera. Failing which you create room for the virus to be created and which would lead to your card to be corrupted.

 

Always STOP Sharing and then remove:

It’s always safe then to be sorry, having to click a couple of times is always much better than to spend few hundred rupees more on purchasing a new card. Make share you end the computer and card network by using the “SAFELY REMOVE HARDWARE” icon and then remove. This is has been a major reason for memory card being corrupted.

 

Keep off from the reader side:

When handling your memory card, make sure you don’t scrub the reader side of the memory cards. Any slight scratch on the reader will completely make your card not get recognized by the computer or camera. In worst scenario, you might not be able to recover your data from the card as well!

 

Keep off from dust:

Pay extra attention while you are not using your card, be double sure that the pocket of you bag or the pouch or the card holder where you place your memory card while not using does not have dust particulars. The very minute dust particulars which might be very small enough to get noticed but be cautious these can damage your card as well.

 

Please feel free to add up few points to this which are being missed out here 🙂

 

Do please let me know your view and comments on this!

 

Keep Clicking!

Chakde!
Ishaq

 

As everything else, even Photography Shoot has to be planned well before, In-fact a little more religiously taken care of. Just Imagine, you find yourselves in a perfect place, with the subject which you have been waiting long to freeze for eternity with your optics right in front of you. You set your Focal Length, Aperture, and ISO all little technical things peeping into your eye piece and just when you press the shutter down don’t see the picture clicked!!! Instead you find your LCD screen flashing, just for you to realize you have a battery that is drained! Or a memory card which is already full and will not allow you click with all your camera setting turned to the lowest! Darn!!! It’s the worst night-mare a photographer would ever face!

 

I too have found myself into such scenarios. Here are few of the check list which I do usually exercise before I start off for any photo-shoot or trips or even hang out with friends and every time i carry my camera along! This after a one point of time though becomes a routine and you don’t actually have to check these, still it’s handy enough for a new Photographer like me. Trust this would be helpful out here for few of you as well 🙂

  1. Place: When you have decided to do a photo-shoot, the very base for your shoot is the place what you have in your mind. Study the place well; this will make your day much easier. With your study you would be able to understand the Type of Crowd you would find there, Subjects you would find, Climate, just in case you are planning for trip far off from your local.
  2. Gear you would carry : Next thing which you would have to do is based on research you should be able to decide precisely on which Lens you will be carrying along. Longer Lens for wildlife, wide-angle for landscapes, Standard Lens with widest aperture for portraits and low light shoots, Tripod just in case you planned to click late evening landscape shoots.
  3. Memory : Any trip you plan, I would suggest carry at-least 4GB of memory space along. Preferably two cards of 2GB. And the larger the memory space you carry the more the freedom to have your finger glued to Shutter!
  4. Two is a company : For most of the hobby photographer like me, who have just worn their running shoes, going out for the Photo-shoot alone with the SLR in hand wandering around all alone with the curious eyes finding every little things to shoot! Phew its more tougher than.
  5. Don’t Shy away from Shutter : Click every and anything which catches your eye and shoot in continuous mode or burst mode, so that you get more picture of the same subject. It will help you not have to delete off the picture just because it was out of focus or the subject put behind some other element in the foreground.
  6. Use Auto focus option : Auto Focus option in the camera is the biggest boon for the amateurs to get your click sharp and appealing, So make sure you use Auto Focus option to the max!
  7. Don’t hurry in deleting : Yes! Don’t judge your click just by looking into your LCD and delete! Never! Even if you are not convinced by the click let it be, get back to home, download it to your PC and Bang! There could be an all together a different appeal in that click! There could be something more interesting which you had not intended to click nor did you notice.
  8. Enjoy your trip : Yeah enjoy your time and don’t just be totally lost into photography that you miss the beauty of the place where you had been!

Yeah last, share your click on my page 🙂

Happy Clicking!

Chakde!

Hey Friends!

This has been the longest that I have been out of my Blogs, Photography, Postings, and Facebook in summary almost from every Online world, Just had been quite held up with my professional life a little so much that I had missed this part of the world for quite some time now…

Below are few of the points which has motivated to come up with this post.

  1. Talk about your passion with someone who would motivate you with your passion more seriously and not with someone who thinks your passion is absolutely time wasting and there are much better things to do in this life. Talking with the latter part of the world will make no good. Period. Speaking with the people who have similar interest is like having a double scoop of your favorite ice cream.
  2. Think!! Yeah you heard it right! Everyone would surely have some time in a day wherein they have nothing to do. Like, I spend about 2 hours in travelling to and fro to my office every day. Think over that time what exactly is your dream about your passion, what you need to take up your passion more seriously. Think about all the photographs of others which has made you say WOW at the first sight and caught your eyes saying “I Should click one such photograph one day!”
  3. Spend time at least couple of your hours over the weekend in your photography. Be it post processing, clicking, looking out at your dump of photos being clicked and studying it what has made you click it, what would had made it a WOW click? Which setting you had used it to click, and which setting would had made your click more interesting and error free?
  4. I would always consider this to be the sort of Golden Rule for keeping myself motivated in Photography. Look at others Photography work. Be it Flickr, Facebook, NGC or anywhere and everywhere. Looking at some great clicks would surely give the much needed push.

 

 

Though these was not clicked right now and I’m posting it though, these were clicked when my Sister had come back from her in-laws with her Kid to my place and I noticed, this Hero catching my eye and could not resist pick up my optics and get some clicks of him.

Hope you enjoy these clicks!

So go ahead enjoy your passion and take it to a great height!

Happy Clicking!

Another extract from the very own DPS, just getting crazily involved with every post out there!

 

No matter what your artistic interests, whether photography, drawing, painting, sculpture, etc., the underlying force behind your work is creativity. It’s much easier to talk about technical aspects of photography as it’s a tangible skill, unlike the more mysterious intangible skill of creative thought.  While every art form is unique unto its own, harnessing one’s creativity is a universal skill.

There are some that might say you either have it or you don’t in relation to creativity, but the truth is we’re all creative. Every child makes believe at some point and lets their imagination run wild, and if I’m correct you were once a child. Creativity is a thought process and one that can be strengthened with practice and exercise. Below are 6 ways I like to get my creative mind working. If you have techniques that work for you be sure to add them in the comments.

1. Never Stop Thinking About Photos
Whether your camera is in hand or not conduct mental exercises to find subjects, mentally frame images and think through how you would capture the subject. Keeping photography constantly in mind is important in training yourself to think creatively. If your mind is primed for creative thought, creativity will have an easier time striking you.

2. Embrace Your Mistakes & Chance
It’s OK for chance or mistakes to bring something new to your attention. Always take a second look at your mistakes and see if it presents something new to the scene that perhaps you hadn’t thought to try. Not every mistake is a creative epiphany, but you’ll never have one if you never look.

3. Find inspiration
Whether viewing artwork at museums, in photo books or immersing yourself in nature, embrace the work of others including Mother Nature to help you see or think in new ways. When our minds are introduced to new techniques or ways of seeing our minds eye begins to expand its view fostering creative thought.

4. Break the Rules
Rules are great as they provide a roadmap of how things can be done or explain why we find something visually appealing. Once you know or have mastered the rules its time to break them. Creativity knows no bounds.  A great creative exercise is to intentionally break a rule to see how you can find a new way of viewing something in a manner that is otherwise “taboo”.

5. Have No Fear
Free yourself from the fear of what others might say if critical of your creative experiments. People by nature almost always have adverse reactions to new things particularly when they’re entrenched in thinking a more common practice is the “right way” or “norm”.  Creativity is the antithesis of a “norm”. Creativity brings a new way to present and see things. Never let norms and the attachment others have to them sway you from your creative exploration of the world before you with your camera.

6. Extract Yourself
Remove yourself from familiar routine and locations. Taking time to be away from the things that normally fill your day is a great way to obtain freedom for your mind to wander. Distraction free time allows for new thoughts and ideas to surface and most importantly it allows you to shape them into actionable projects.

 

Another very useful article to enhance the Quality of our Photography is here from DPS.

Hope you guys would surely enjoy reading this just as I did. Thanks a loads Mr Darren!

Sometimes autofocus can be really annoying. For some shots it’ll focus on the right part of your subject, but then the very next shot it may choose to focus on something far and away into the background.

Sure, you could avoid this problem by always using manual focus, but autofocus is great when you need to focus quickly or when you’re photographing a landscape and you need to focus on a certain spot in the scene.

Well, autofocus doesn’t have to be annoying anymore, because here are three ways to get better control of it:

#1 – Press your shutter button half-way to activate autofocus and then recompose

Set your autofocus point to the center spot, then point this spot where you want to focus and press your shutter button half-way (don’t press it completely yet) to initiate autofocus. Then, while still holding down the button half-way, recompose your shot and press the button completely down to snap the photo.

#2 – Switch to manual focus after auto-focusing

Use autofocus as you normally do, but once it focuses on the right spot, just switch off autofocus on your lens to manual focus. Your lens will keep the current focus when you do this. This method works well when your camera is on a tripod and you’re taking multiple exposures from the same spot, like when photographing a landscape.

#3 – Use back-button auto-focusing

Normally, your camera will autofocus when you press the shutter button, but with back-button autofocusing, you have to press a button on the back of the camera instead, giving you complete control of when autofocus is initiated.

With back-button autofocusing, you can just set the autofocus point to the center spot, then point that where you want to focus, and finally press the back button to automatically focus on that point. Now for all the shots you take from that position, that focus will be maintained (the camera won’t randomly focus into the background anymore).

You can do the same thing without this back-button autofocusing by switching to manual focus after the camera focuses properly, but using the back button saves time and this way you don’t have to constantly switch back and forth between manual and autofocus (which can inadvertently move the camera sometimes).

Back-button focusing is especially helpful for photographing moving subjects, like birds in flight or other wildlife: just switch on the continuous focusing mode, set the autofocus point to the center spot, and hold down that back button. Now you don’t have to worry about accidentally hitting the shutter button while you’re tracking the subject in your viewfinder.

How to enable back-button autofocusing: Unfortunately, this feature is called something different on each camera, so you’ll probably have to do some digging around in your camera’s manual and “custom functions” to find it. If it’s not labelled clearly on your camera, try changing the settings of the different buttons on the back of your camera (like the AE lock button).

This week is being completely dull with me with regard to clicking couple of photographs which would make me feel much better reviewing them on my computer screen and thinking back on how it would had being better if I had captured it from any other angle or setting.

Well, My friend has just borrowed my camera for a while for his family function which is why I have being left with No Camera around. Though at first I thought it would be a boring week with no time for required Photography and to complete my weekly self assigned as well.

On the other side of I running out of my camera is really being quite helpful. It has helped me to go back to dig out my early clicks which was taken early days of I buying a Camera to off-late clicks which I had taken until couple of weeks back. I have being a serious visitor of Photography Sites to gain some more required knowledge as I’m still a newbie and I’m on the learning curve, and have seen many a times on the net to spend time reviewing our past clicks as it would help you to give an Insight view on your Photography as to where are you heading to? Are there any clicks off lately which you can look back at them and say “Wow! This is really great” and known why do you think it has that “Wow” factor in it?

And, in these review you would surely come across 100’s click which makes absolutely no sense and still you have clicked, and many of the clicks of a particular subject always being clicked in the similar angle or with similar approach! This reviewing would surely help you look back at those and just think over what you have to do the next time you get to click the similar subject to get that “Wow” factor in it.

Spending time on net checking out other Photographers clicks and Photography Blogs are always worth spending time, each time you visit such pages you would come across few things which though very obvious, a little different way of approach has made it stand out of the tonnes of tonnes of Photographs over the net.

Most of all, nature around always looks very beautiful when you don’t have a camera with you, so enjoy the nature around and get involved! 🙂

So take time to check your clicks and check out the net to gain that little push, which would get that “Wow” Factor in your clicks.!
Have a fun-filled Clicking weekend!

Chakde!
Ishaq

Well its time to think about  your self into Photography aspect!  Have you ever being overly obsessed about a single type of Photography?

About me its a “BIG yes”!  I have being shooting a very similarly clicks the subjects which I have being clicking, Hope fully, i would try something new from now of after reading the post on DPS. Thanks a zillions Darren! for such a great details on the composition techniques.

Below is the extract from DPS which I wanted to share with you.

 

The last time it happened was in the weeks after buying a new fast lens – a f/1.4 50mm lens. Having something so fast resulted in me almost setting the aperture at it’s largest setting (f/1.4) and shooting everything at that setting!The problem was that all my shots became very similar to one another. Lots of shots with very small depth of field.

It’s happened to me before in different ways.

Format – I went through a ‘patch’ a year or two ago when I realized that all my shots were taken in a horizontal (landscape) framing and that I rarely went into vertical (portrait) mode.

Shutter Speed – Another time (years ago) I had a stage of shooting everything at slow shutter speeds (I thought the blur was artistic…. go figure!)

[Here I’m seriously tempted to try my hands on Slow Shutter Speed Photography very soon . You can expect a post on it very soon 🙂 ]

Focal Length – I also went through a patch after buying a 24-105mm lens of always shooting tightly framed shots (at 105mm).

Photographic obsessions can take many shapes and forms (I’m sure we could come up with a good long list of how we all do it). They often follow the purchase of a new piece of gear or the learning of a new technique and to some extent they are natural.

In fact they can actually be helpful at times as they help you to learn how to use that new lens or perfect that new technique that you’ve been trying. However they can also have their ‘costs’ and leave you with a collection of images that have a certain level of “sameness” about them.

Here’s something to do to check your photographic obsessions:

  • Open up your photo organizing tool (whether it’s a program on your computer, an online storage tool etc) and scroll through the last couple of months of images.
  1. What do you notice?
  2. What type of subjects are you photographing?
  3. What type of framing do you use?
  4. Which format do you shoot in (horizontal/vertical)?
  5. What aperture are you shooting at?
  6. What shutter speed?
  7. What ISO setting do you use?
  8. What focal length are you using?
  9. Do you always use the same lens?
  10. While there’s nothing wrong with noticing similarities between your shots (we all have our own style) it can be sometimes useful to know what your tenancies are and to encourage yourself to step out into trying new things with your photography.

 

This post made me open my Flickr account and check my self on my photography obsession, and yeah I found myself locked up with similar kind of photography for years.

Keep locked for the composition tips here very soon!
Have a great weekend!
Happy shooting 🙂

 

Another most interesting and very useful note for photography minded people to keep themselves a better photographer with every day passes by.  Read on and enjoy!

No matter what your artistic interests, whether photography, drawing, painting, sculpture, etc., the underlying force behind your work is creativity. It’s much easier to talk about technical aspects of photography as it’s a tangible skill, unlike the more mysterious intangible skill of creative thought.  While every art form is unique unto its own, harnessing one’s creativity is a universal skill.

There are some that might say you either have it or you don’t in relation to creativity, but the truth is we’re all creative. Every child makes believe at some point and lets their imagination run wild, and if I’m correct you were once a child. Creativity is a thought process and one that can be strengthened with practice and exercise. Below are 6 ways I like to get my creative mind working. If you have techniques that work for you be sure to add them in the comments.

1. Never Stop Thinking About Photos
Whether your camera is in hand or not conduct mental exercises to find subjects, mentally frame images and think through how you would capture the subject. Keeping photography constantly in mind is important in training yourself to think creatively. If your mind is primed for creative thought, creativity will have an easier time striking you.

2. Embrace Your Mistakes & Chance
It’s OK for chance or mistakes to bring something new to your attention. Always take a second look at your mistakes and see if it presents something new to the scene that perhaps you hadn’t thought to try. Not every mistake is a creative epiphany, but you’ll never have one if you never look.

3. Find inspiration
Whether viewing artwork at museums, in photo books or immersing yourself in nature, embrace the work of others including Mother Nature to help you see or think in new ways. When our minds are introduced to new techniques or ways of seeing our mindseye begins to expand its view fostering creative thought.

4. Break the Rules
Rules are great as they provide a roadmap of how things can be done or explain why we find something visually appealing. Once you know or have mastered the rules its time to break them. Creativity knows no bounds.  A great creative exercise is to intentionally break a rule to see how you can find a new way of viewing something in a manner that is otherwise “taboo”.

5. Have No Fear
Free yourself from the fear of what others might say if critical of your creative experiments. People by nature almost always have adverse reactions to new things particularly when they’re entrenched in thinking a more common practice is the “right way” or “norm”.  Creativity is the antithesis of a “norm”. Creativity brings a new way to present and see things. Never let norms and the attachment others have to them sway you from your creative exploration of the world before you with your camera.

6. Extract Yourself
Remove yourself from familiar routine and locations. Taking time to be away from the things that normally fill your day is a great way to obtain freedom for your mind to wander. Distraction free time allows for new thoughts and ideas to surface and most importantly it allows you to shape them into actionable projects.

 

I was just surfing around on DPS, and found this, its just a bundle of few basic things which if followed would surely take our way of Photography to a new extent which every photographer dreams about.

This list is surely not restricted to listed 100 things, there can be much much more, if you come across any such point, please do post it here. 🙂

1. Never do photography to become a “Rock-star“.

2. Enjoy what you are shooting.

3. Prepare well for your shooting, realizing that your battery isn’t charge when you’re setting up for that sunrise shoot is too late!

4. Always take one warm garment more than you actually need with you

5. Pay attention to your thoughts and emotions while you are shooting

6. Set goals you can achieve

7. Write tips about photography, because writing is also learning

8. Never go shooting without a tripod

9. Be pleased with the little prosperities

10. Build relationships with potential photo buddies

11. Watch the place you want to shoot first with your heart then with the camera

12. Always stay calm

13. Know that you tend to overestimate yourself

14. Perspective is the killer

15. Dedicate yourself to photography, but never boost yourself too much

16. Take part in a photography community

17. Keep your camera clean

18. Never compare yourself to others in a better or worse context

19. Find your own style of photography

20. Try to compose more and to hit the shutter less

21. Seek out and learn to accept critique on your images

22. Do something different to recover creativity

23. Get inspiration from the work of other photographers

24. Criticize honestly but respectfully

25. Get feedback from your lady

26. Don’t copy other photographer’s style

27. Be bold

28. Take care of the golden ratio

29. 10mm rocks!

30. Take selfportraits

31. Read books about photography

32. To give a landscape photograph the extra boost, integrate a person (maybe yourself)

33. Every shooting situation is different than you expect

34. Pay attention to s-curves and lines

35. Always shoot in RAW

36. Keep your sensor clean, so you can save some work cleaning your image in post production

37. Discover the things you think are beautiful

38. It takes time to become a good photographer

39. The best equipment is that what you have now

40. You can’t take photographs of everything

41. Break the rules of photography knowingly, but not your camera

42. Pay attention to the different way that light falls on different parts of your scene

43. The eye moves to the point of contrast

44. Clouds increase the atmosphere of a landscape

45. Start a photoblog

46. Accept praise and say “thank you

47. ‘Nice Shot’ is not a very useful comment to write

48. ‘Amazing!’ isn’t useful either. Try to describe specifically what you like or don’t like about an image.

49. You are not your camera

50. Ask a question at the end of your comment on a photo to get a ping-pong conversation with the photographer

51. Do a review of your archives on a regular basis, the longer you photograph – the more diamonds are hidden there

52. Always clarify what the eye-catcher (focal point) will be in your image

53. No image is better than a bad one

54. Everyone has to start little

55. Your opinion about photography is important!

56. Leave a funny but thoughtful comment

57. Speak about your experiences with your photo buddies

58. Limit your photograph to the substance

59. Participate in Photo-contests

60. Post processing = Optimizing your image to the best result

61. Shoot exposure latitudes as often as possible

62. Use photomatix as seldom as possible, HDR’s always have a synthetic flavor

63. Always remember what brought you to photography

64. Never shoot a person who doensn’t want to be photographed

65. Always turn around, sometimes the better image is behind you

66. It’s who’s behind the camera, not the camera

67. Mistakes are allowed! The more mistakes you make, the more you learn!

68. If you have an idea and immediately you think : No, this is not going to work – Do it anyway. When in doubt – always shoot.

69. Understand and look into your histogram while shooting. It delivers very important information about your image

70. Know your camera, because searching the menu button in the night is time you don’t want to waste

71. Shoot as often as possible

72. Believe in yourself

73. Don’t be afraid of getting dirty

74. Pay attention to qualitiy in your image

75. Your photographs are a personal map of your psyche

76. Re-check your ISO-Settings. It’s aweful to detect the wrong settings on your screen.

77. Be thankful for long and thoughtful comments on your images

78. Never trust your LCD. Normally it is brighter and sharper as the original image.

79. Provide for enough disc space, because it’s cheap and you will need it.

80. Learn to enjoy beautiful moments when you don’t have a camera with you.

81. Always arrive at least half an hour earlier before sunrise / sundown, composing in a hurry is a bad thing.

82. Try to amplify your mental and physical limits. Takes some extra shots when you think “it’s enough”

83. Pay attention to structures in the sky and wait until they fit into structures in the foreground

84. Visit the same place as often as possible. Light never shows the same mountain.

85. Print your images in big size. You will love it.

86. Calibrate your monitor. Working with a monitor that is not accurate is like being together with someone you can’t trust. It always ends badly.

87. Don’t think about what others may say about your image. If you like it, it’s worth publishing.

88. Never address reproaches to yourself. Learn from your mistakes and look forward, not backward.

89. Fight your laziness! Creativity comes after discipline.

90. Ask yourself: What do you want to express in your images ?

91. Always try to think outside the box, collect new ideas about photographs you could do and ask yourself: Why not?

92. Search for a mentor.

93. Photography is never a waste of time.

94. Every community has it’s downsides. Don’t leave it out of an emotional response.

95. There will always be people who will not like what you are doing.

96. Henri Cartier-Bresson was right when he said that “Your first 10,000 photographs are your worst.”

97. A better camera doesn’t guarantee better images.

98. Always have printing in mind when you post-process your images.

99. Photography is fair: You gain publicity with the quality of your images. Unless the images are stolen, there is no way of cheating yourself higher.

100. Write a 100 things list

Chakde!
Ishaq